Autism isn’t as scary as the news wants you to think


     Are you afraid of autism?

     When I was pregnant I was afraid of being too stressed out because I heard stress causes autism. I stressed over not stressing.

      I know the main reason I get the same questions over and over again about autism is because people are afraid. They want to know how they can dodge this bullet.

     Fear not.

     Autism occurs in 1 in 100 children and 1 in 70 boys.

     Scientists have NO CLUE what causes it. No matter what the study you heard on the Today Show said — the fact remains, they have no idea what is causing autism.

     It is believed to be genetic. There is no test for the gene. So you have no way to know if you have the gene.

    So really, it’s a crapshoot.

    No matter how many things you avoid, no matter how much you worry about not worrying, no matter how close in age your babies are, or whatever the latest study is telling you to be afraid of, your odds are the same. And frankly, they aren’t that great as far as avoiding this thing you fear so much. If you have a kid, your kid has a 1 in 100 chance of having autism. If that child is a boy, he has a 1 in 70 chance of having autism.

     AAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!! I’M FREAKING OUT!!! SCARY STUFF …. right?

     Nah. Autism isn’t scary and it is nothing to be afraid of. I think it is a gift – and so does Dr. Temple Grandin – she has autism and she wouldn’t change it for anything.

    And I wouldn’t change my son for anything. He is perfect and awesome just the way he is. (Yes, I really think that. I really wouldn’t take his autism away if I could – though I would definitely get rid of some of the not-so-fun behaviors.)

    So I think you should just take a nice deep breath (deep breath in …. deep breath out …… there …. doesn’t that feel better?) and stop worrying so much. Your kid will be fine, and no matter how much you worry and avoid things that may cause autism — he will still have the same odds of having autism. Sorry Charlie.

   Fear not. Everything is as it should be.

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“Do you think his autism was caused by the shots?”


Short answer: Maybe.

Long answer: I think my son was born with autism. I even think he had autism while in the womb. I think autism is a part of who my son is, and I think he has always had autism. In the womb he didn’t kick very much. He moved so little that twice I checked myself into the hospital because I was afraid he had died in there since he never moved.  Also, anytime I would rub my pregnant belly and try to picture who my son was and what type of person he would be I would always picture him at a table with a tutor. I envisioned that he would need extra help, that he would have trouble learning. And at the same time I knew he would be fine, and that we was smart – just different. I don’t know why I had these thoughts – and now I see that I must be psychic.  I will add that to my to do list: work on harnessing my psychic power. 🙂

He was always different. If I had known the early signs of autism it would have been obvious that he had autism. But I had no clue what autism was. And so he wasn’t diagnosed until he was 2 1/2 even though I always knew he was different. So I don’t think my son was born typical then changed, or got a shot and suddenly had autism. I have heard many first hand accounts of that happening though, so I believe it is true and it happens. They basically break it into two categories – early onset and late onset autism.

“There are two types of autism—an early-onset type and a later-onset regressive type—retrospective studies have suggested. When infants have the former, their level of complex babbling, word production, and declarative pointing are lower than those produced by typically developing children at a year or so of age. When infants have the latter, they behave essentially like normally developing infants during the first year or so of life, but by age 2, use significantly fewer words, respond to their names much less often, and look at people much less often than typically developing children do (Psychiatric News, October 7, 2005).” http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/42/15/28.1.full

So is it the shots or not?

Well I think you should definitely be educated on what is in the shots. And be aware of how many toxins are in there, the fact that formaldehyde is in the shots. On the CDC website you can read about the ingredients: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/appendices/B/excipient-table-1.pdf

and on another government website you can read about how formaldehyde is classified as a known carcinogen: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/formaldehyde

So yeah, I would then think that most rational folk would ask “So why are you injecting us with it?”

So is it the shots or not?

I think it has something to do with toxins in our environment.  And those toxins enter our bodies through the water we drink , the air we breathe, the food we eat, the shots we get, the paint, the plastic, the aluminum, the mercury, etc. I believe what the scientists have found in their research.  I think genetics comes into play because we don’t all react the same to these toxins.  Kind of  like how smoking causes cancer but some people can smoke their whole lives and never get cancer.

Here are some notes I took at an autism conference about this:

“It is believed that autism is 90% genetic. These genes aren’t all bad – sometimes they create genius!

Autism seems to be caused by a group of genes all acting together to create autism. These genes are called the “Broader Autistic Phenotype”. Evidence of this can be found in family members of the affected child. They tend to have ADHD, social deficits, and depression. So autism is the collaboration of all of these genes working together to create autism.”

So basically I think, and science seems to be proving, that autism is genetic and those with autism have a predisposition to being affected by these toxins. So in a roundabout way – yes, the shots can be causing autism. Just as much as the water, and the food, and the plastics, and the bug spray, and the fertilizers, etc.

Do I vaccinate my kids? Not anymore. They’ve already had all of the shots that I was required to have. They both have the “religious exemption” and I know what all the nay sayers say — but look at the vaccine requirements when we were kids vs today– why do they have to get so many compared to when we were kids? Requiring two chickenpox (varicella) shots in order to start kindergarten is where I drew the line.

Comparison of CDC Mandatory Vaccine Schedule
Children birth to six years (recommended month)

USA 1983

DTP (2)
OPV (2)
DTP (4)
OPV (4)
DTP (6)
MMR (15)
DTP (18)
OPV (18)
DTP (48)
OPV (48)

USA 2008

Influenza
(prenatal)
Hep B (birth)
Hep B (1)
DTaP (2)
Hib (2)
IPV (2)
PCV (2)
Rotavrus (2)
Hep B (4)
DTaP (4)
Hib (4)
IPV (4)
PCV (4)
Rotavirus (4)
Hep B (6)
DTaP (6)
Hib (6)
IPV (6)
PCV (6)
Influenza (6)
Rotavirus (6)
Hib (12)
MMR (12)
Varicella (12)
PCV (12)
Hep A (12)
DTaP (15)
Hep A (18)
Influenza (18)
Influenza (30)
Influenza (42)
MMR (48)
DTaP (48)
IPV (48)
Influenza (54)
Influenza (66)

Too many, too soon?

November 2017
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